Legacy My books 

At last my novel is published – and eerily prescient too

A few weeks ago my first novel, The Legacy, was published in America. Although a work of fiction, it has turned out to be quite eerily prescient. It took me more years to write than I care to admit. Most of that time I was staring at a blank screen telling myself that writing a novel was beyond me. I was merely a journalist who analysed current issues. Other, superior beings were creatives who could excavate from the recesses of their psyche a page-turning plot and characters who leapt from…

Read More
elephant in the room regime change Iran Global conflict 

The elephant in the room is regime change

Amid the brouhaha over President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the US out of the appalling Iran nuclear deal, the elephant in the room is standing quietly all but unobserved. Trump’s initiative is being either praised to the skies or deplored with dismay. The question being discussed is whether it will force the Iranian regime to abandon its nuclear program in a new deal or precipitate a terrible war. Following Trump’s announcement, an Iranian missile attack on Israeli military bases on the Golan Heights led to heavy Israeli air strikes…

Read More
Europeans lose minds and moral compass Global conflict 

Have Britain and Europe lost their minds as well as their moral compass?

The Europeans’ determination to keep the appalling Iran nuclear deal going, following President Trump’s decision to pull the US out of it, makes very little sense on its own declared terms. Leave aside the shocking determination of Britain, France and Germany to continue to milk one of the deal’s most disturbing features: that it enabled the Iranian regime to pocket more than $1.7 billion which it used to fund Hezbollah and Hamas, build its missile infrastructure to destroy Israel and attack the west, and deploy proxy armies to bring conflict…

Read More
secular Britain 

Times column and exploding brains

While my Times column this morning has attracted much support (for which, many thanks to all) other brains appears to have been exploding over my argument that there is no moral equivalence between antisemitism and Islamophobia. The New Statesman has devoted an entire article, no less, to what it calls my “terrible column on the ‘fiction’ of Islamophobia, annotated”. Writer Nicky Woolf laboriously holds up paragraph after paragraph for scrutiny. Presumably she intends to demonstrate that not one of my arguments can withstand the force of such forensic analysis. Alas,…

Read More
Antisemitism and Islamophobia Britain 

Islamophobia is a fiction to shut down debate

Islamophobia is a fiction to shut down debate Remarks I made on BBC TV’s Sunday Politics seem to have caused some controversy. Even before the credits started to roll, Twitter was going into meltdown. I had said there was no equivalence between antisemitism and Islamophobia. The former was a deranged demonisation of a people; the latter was used to shut down debate. Cue foaming outrage. No matter that I acknowledged the existence of prejudice against Muslims, just as against Sikhs, Hindus and others. In denying Islamophobia, I was an Islamophobic…

Read More
titanic Britain 

Sunday Politics show: why Anna Soubry was wrong

I appeared on BBC TV’s Sunday Politics show last weekend, talking about the local election results and the Brexit negotiations. You can watch the whole show here. On Brexit, I said this about the proposal for Britain to remain in a customs union with the EU (my remarks were kindly reported in the Express:) “Either you are in the EU or you are not in the EU.The customs union is a way of keeping us in the EU by stealth and all those voters, all those millions of British voters,…

Read More
Truth Vanquishing Falsehood; Alfred Stevens, 1867-8 USA 

More truth in fiction in Trump’s America

I have been in America to give some talks about the state of the West. Arriving at New York’s JFK airport, I’m at the end of a queue of several hundred people snaking back from the passport hall. Behind me, an enterprising Englishman detects an ambiguity in the instruction to stay in this queue rather than the other one where the number of people is zero. “Shall we give this a try?” he asks me, and we sprint past the hundreds standing patiently in line. I reach the passport official…

Read More
Mad Hatter's tea-party, from Alice's Adventure in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll; Tenniel illustration Britain 

Rudderless over immigration in Brexitland

What a mess the British government is now in over immigration — a mess that the arrival of the new Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, is unlikely to clear up. Consider. Amber Rudd resigned as Home Secretary through misleading Parliament over whether or not the government had “uncompassionate” targets for removing illegal immigrants. This followed the revelation that the government had treated appallingly Caribbean “Windrush” immigrants who arrived in the sixties but who were threatened with deportation decades later. These Windrush immigrants, however, were in Britain legally. Doesn’t the fact that…

Read More
islands Britain Israel USA 

Three islands of exceptionalism in west’s darkest hour

On a plane to New York this week, I watched the movie Darkest Hour for the second time. If it packed a punch the first time, on second showing it seemed even more apposite to our current nail-biting era. The movie is about the traumatic period in May 1940 when, as the Nazis swept across Europe, Britain was staring at the prospect of defeat and invasion. Darkest Hour points out the catastrophic error of trying to negotiate with a regime whose agenda brooks no compromise. Britain didn’t acknowledge this until…

Read More