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Brexit Britain 

Brexit: no-deal is better than trashing democracy

We can now see that when Theresa May said “no-deal is better than a bad deal”, what she really meant was that no-deal was not just worse than a bad deal but was in fact her personal red line. This was singularly unfortunate, since it was obvious from the start that the EU would never agree to anything that would enable Britain to do what the Brexit vote intended it to do: become competitive and prosper. Since the EU is a protectionist cartel designed to stifle competition and freedom from…

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Brexit Britain 

The second shoe drops in the Brexit coup

In her 2016 Conservative party leadership speech, Theresa May said this: “I will create a new government department responsible for conducting Britain’s negotiation with the EU and for supporting the rest of Whitehall in its European work. That department will be led by a senior Secretary of State – and I will make sure that the position is taken by a Member of Parliament who campaigned for Britain to leave the EU.” Her first appointment as Brexit Secretary was the Brexiteer David Davis. When earlier this month he resigned from…

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insanity Britain 

Rudderless over immigration in Brexitland

What a mess the British government is now in over immigration — a mess that the arrival of the new Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, is unlikely to clear up. Consider. Amber Rudd resigned as Home Secretary through misleading Parliament over whether or not the government had “uncompassionate” targets for removing illegal immigrants. This followed the revelation that the government had treated appallingly Caribbean “Windrush” immigrants who arrived in the sixties but who were threatened with deportation decades later. These Windrush immigrants, however, were in Britain legally. Doesn’t the fact that…

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brexit Britain 

Why the Judges Have Got it Wrong on Brexit

Legal experts have challenged the High Court’s judgment more effectively than Theresa May The High Court ruling that parliament must give its consent before Britain can begin to leave the EU is redolent with irony. The argument that parliamentary sovereignty must not be overridden was brought by people who themselves want Britain to remain in the EU and who so negate the sovereignty of parliament. Conversely Brexiteers, whose cause is the restoration of parliamentary sovereignty, put themselves in difficulties by inveighing against a ruling which seeks to uphold that same…

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